Blog

The official blog for Ellsworth Dynamic.

  • 13 Years Ago - Thoughts and Feelings

    Seconds after I awoke on the morning of September 12, 2001 was one of the only moments in my life when I seriously asked myself: “Was that all a dream?”

    The morning of September 11, 2001 remains one of my most vivid memories, as I am sure it is for everybody who is old enough to remember that day. I recall how beautiful and perfect a day it was; it was one of those rare days when the weather couldn’t decide if it was summer or fall. I was the only person in the office that day. I was working as a video editor, my feet still barely wet. I remember listening to WXRT and working on a motion graphic design when the news broke.

    I won’t go into detail of the series of emotions and feelings I experienced, as everyone in this country (hell, most of the world) went through them. Fear, confusion, grief, disbelief, sadness, relief, gratefulness, patriotism, love, hate, anger… all of us experienced these feelings and more simultaneously. But, the feeling that trumped them all for me was surrealism. Was this all really happening? The world seemed to cross over into some weird, dreamlike existence. The world all of the sudden was fake, yet more real than it’s ever been

    This feeling wasn’t uncommon. Many people said they felt like they were watching a movie. Or a dream. I felt both. How else were we supposed to react and feel? Very few of us were old enough to remember December 7, 1941 and only some of us were old enough to remember the November 22, 1963. For some of us, this was our very first world-shaking event.

    I remember calling my mother minutes after the second tower collapsed. Sometimes, calling your mother is the only thing to do. We talked about what was happening and discussed our swarm of feelings and emotions. I remember sobbing to my mother over the phone.

    —-

    Man. I feel so self important and selfish writing about my feelings like this. Like it wasn’t something that happened to all of us. I was nowhere near New York City on September 11, 2001. I did not know anybody who died, nor do I know anybody who lost anyone. What do my thoughts and memories matter? There are thousands of other people whom this event affected on a much greater scale.

    —-

    While September 11, 2001 was surreal and dreamlike, I am reminded of how the following weeks were even more so.

    Remember how nice everybody was? We all treated each other with more care and respect than usual. There was a lot more “holding the door open for strangers,” “waving in drivers trying to change lanes in heavy traffic,” and “giving up seats on trains and buses for somebody who needs it” than normal.

    The country got a lot quieter as the level of obnoxiousness seemed to go from the usual 10 down to a 2. People stopped yelling into their cell phones. The volume of coffee-shop chatter went down to a polite whisper. Even supermarkets had an eerie silence about them.

    We all treated each other like a respected member of our family. We were all a little more patient, understanding, polite, and respectful. It was like the Christmas season came early in 2011, but without the cheer.

    The events of 9/11 brought everybody closer together. It was the only time I can remember when we, as a people, were truly all one. It saddens me that it took such a horrific event to create a collective feeling of unity, and it saddens me even more that it lasted for such a short while.

    But every year as the anniversary of this horrible event passes, I am reminded of how lucky I am to have the love of my friends and family and how easy it is to take that for granted.

  • My Oscar predictions and personal votes for the 86th Academy Awards.

    My Oscar predictions and personal votes for the 86th Academy Awards.

  • rifftraxmike:

Think about this very carefully: what if this were the last face you ever saw?You shivered, didn’t you? You felt the cold hand of your own mortality but you also felt true fear, a fear tinged with existential dread. For those under a certain age this thing is nothing more than a passing horror. But to those old enough to have grown up with Mr. Rogers you’ll recognize it as, get this, Lady Elaine Fairchilde. Yep. Lady Elaine. It was never explained. Every kid alive who saw it shivered and felt the deep sensation that something was wrong. Something was very, very wrong. But because it was contained within the rather benign wrappings of a very mild mannered and friendly children’s show each child assumed that perhaps only she felt the icy wind of death blow throw her living room. I mean, it must be me, right? Nice Mr. Rogers wouldn’t do this to children, would he?
The eyes, brimming with dead menace. The chopped haircut of a madman. The gin blossoms of the meanest drunk who ever killed a man at a train station for a can of beans. Clown white trowled heavily into the brows. The nose like W.C. Field’s fungus infested toe.And the smile. A smile of bottomless malevolence. A smile that says, “Oh, I will kill you. Yes, my friend, that is a given. But I won’t just kill you. What I have in store for you is whole galaxies of suffering as yet undreamt of by the cruelest sadist ever spat out of hell.You can pray for death, but it will not come. Look into my eyes — ah, good, I see the despair now. You know your prayers cannot find their way to God because I have killed Him. I have killed all hope. All redemption. Only suffering lives now. You and it have become one thing. I shall make eternity even longer through the sheer force of my own cruelty.”
Anyway, I remember watching it before afternoon Kindergarten.

    rifftraxmike:

    Think about this very carefully: what if this were the last face you ever saw?

    You shivered, didn’t you? You felt the cold hand of your own mortality but you also felt true fear, a fear tinged with existential dread. For those under a certain age this thing is nothing more than a passing horror. But to those old enough to have grown up with Mr. Rogers you’ll recognize it as, get this, Lady Elaine Fairchilde. Yep. Lady Elaine. 

    It was never explained. Every kid alive who saw it shivered and felt the deep sensation that something was wrong. Something was very, very wrong. But because it was contained within the rather benign wrappings of a very mild mannered and friendly children’s show each child assumed that perhaps only she felt the icy wind of death blow throw her living room. I mean, it must be me, right? Nice Mr. Rogers wouldn’t do this to children, would he?

    The eyes, brimming with dead menace. The chopped haircut of a madman. The gin blossoms of the meanest drunk who ever killed a man at a train station for a can of beans. Clown white trowled heavily into the brows. The nose like W.C. Field’s fungus infested toe.

    And the smile. A smile of bottomless malevolence. A smile that says, “Oh, I will kill you. Yes, my friend, that is a given. But I won’t just kill you. What I have in store for you is whole galaxies of suffering as yet undreamt of by the cruelest sadist ever spat out of hell.

    You can pray for death, but it will not come. Look into my eyes — ah, good, I see the despair now. You know your prayers cannot find their way to God because I have killed Him. I have killed all hope. All redemption. Only suffering lives now. You and it have become one thing. I shall make eternity even longer through the sheer force of my own cruelty.”

    Anyway, I remember watching it before afternoon Kindergarten.

    (via paulftompkins)

    Source: rifftraxmike

  • Simon Pegg: metaphoric zombies, terrorist patsies, and the war cry of the vegetarian
Rhik Samadder, theguardian.com
A conversation with the Cornetto Trilogy star takes a turn for the Slavoj ŽižekWhy are you obsessed with neighbourhoods overrun by zombies and alien replicants?"The theme throughout The Cornetto Trilogy is loss of identity in a…

Pegg has some very interesting theories on some films…

    Simon Pegg: metaphoric zombies, terrorist patsies, and the war cry of the vegetarian
    Rhik Samadder, theguardian.com

    A conversation with the Cornetto Trilogy star takes a turn for the Slavoj Žižek

    Why are you obsessed with neighbourhoods overrun by zombies and alien replicants?
    "The theme throughout The Cornetto Trilogy is loss of identity in a…

    Pegg has some very interesting theories on some films…

  • Watch: ‘Hell No: The Sensible Horror Film’ Where Characters Make Smart Decisions
Paula Bernstein, indiewire.com
Watch: ‘Hell No: The Sensible Horror Film’ Where Characters Make Smart DecisionsDoes it drive you crazy when characters in horror films make outrageously bad decisions — like going skinny dipping when there’s a mad man on the loose in the wood…

Just in time for Halloween horror movies! Funny!

    Watch: ‘Hell No: The Sensible Horror Film’ Where Characters Make Smart Decisions
    Paula Bernstein, indiewire.com

    Watch: ‘Hell No: The Sensible Horror Film’ Where Characters Make Smart Decisions

    Does it drive you crazy when characters in horror films make outrageously bad decisions — like going skinny dipping when there’s a mad man on the loose in the wood…

    Just in time for Halloween horror movies! Funny!

  • How I work when I finally have my keyboard shortcuts set

    renderplease:

    image

    Source: renderplease

  • LOVE with my Love.

  • 'All You Need Is Love'rollingstone.com

They had a point…
  • My assistant editors. Lucy and Lola.

  • ellsworthdynamic:

Frank Zappa: 1940-1993
By David Fricke, rollingstone.com
“Watch out where the huskies go/And don’t you eat that yellow snow” — Frank ZappaDur­ing his life­time, Frank Zappa was called many things by his admir­ers and crit­ics alike…

Good article. Amazing musician.

    ellsworthdynamic:

    Frank Zappa: 1940-1993
    By David Fricke, rollingstone.com

    “Watch out where the huskies go/And don’t you eat that yellow snow” — Frank Zappa

    Dur­ing his life­time, Frank Zappa was called many things by his admir­ers and crit­ics alike…

    Good article. Amazing musician.

    Source: ellsworthdynamic